Gazans Leave War Zone Homes to Fight With ISIS

Gazans are showing up in Islamic State forces in Syria and Iraq

In the wake of James Foley’s death, there is a renewed focus on foreigners traveling to war zones to fight alongside militant groups. British Prime Minister David Cameron returned home from a vacation to deal with questions over the seemingly British ISIS member who took a knife to the U.S. reporter’s throat. Other jihadis from around Europe have become extremely active on social media, attracting the attention of journalists worldwide.

Among the ISIS ranks are a number of fighters from peaceful European countries, including Belgium and the Netherlands. Meeting them when they arrive in Syria and Iraq are a growing number of Gazans. There is no shortage of war and conflict in Israel and the Palestinian territories, of course, but Gazans are still making their way to foreign conflicts to fight alongside the notorious and brutal Islamic State, known as ISIS.

Vocativ reported last month on ISIS’ evolving presence in Sinai and the Gaza Strip, and groups from that area have expressed their philosophical support for ISIS since early 2014. Palestinian refugees (500,000 of whom were living in Syria when the conflict there erupted) were drawn into Syria’s conflict early on, but it now appears that groups that have pledged loyalty to ISIS leader Al-Baghdadi are sending representatives into the heart of the ISIS battlefield, and individual Gazans are also joining the fight of their own volition.

Among those Gazans known to have died in battle with ISIS are a number who hail from Rafah, Nuseirat and Jabalia and have fallen in Homs and Aleppo in Syria and Samara in Iraq.

According to ISIS forums and official social media accounts, two of the Gazans who have been killed in action recently were from Sinai-based Ansar Beit al-Maqdis and Ansar al-Dawla al-Islamia. The men had traveled to Iraq as “official representatives” of those groups to fight in Syria alongside ISIS.

The Ansar al-Dawla’s group’s Twitter account posted a short eulogy for one of those representatives, Muhammad Naif al-Qarinawi. Al-Qarinawi was an engineer from Nuseirat, a refugee camp in central Gaza, and he fought under the nom de guerre Abi al-Bara al-Ghazi. Abi al-Bara was sent to Syria to bring his operational expertise, especially in explosives engineering, to ISIS. Al-Bara reportedly died just outside Homs on July 26 during an ISIS military operation in which a 2,000-man force mounted an attack on the Sha’er gas field. Fighting at the gas field continued for 10 days, after which it was eventually recaptured by the Syrian military.

Beit al-Maqdis’ representative Ali Samir Abu al-Ainin was originally from Rafah and also died on July 26. He died in Samara, Iraq, the site of the 2006 bombing of a Shiite shrine that plunged the country into a violent sectarian war. In late July, ISIS began targeting roads and installations in Samara, which is thought to be group’s next big target in its attempt to push southward toward Baghdad.

Other Gazans are apparently heading to foreign conflict zones, and several have been killed in the heart of ISIS battles in Syria, although it’s unclear on which side they were fighting. At least two Gazans were killed last fall. Amer Abu al-Ghula, also from the Nusirat refugee camp, died in Aleppo, Syria, in a battle with Hezbollah.

Respond Now
FUN

The Secret World of Unsearchable YouTube Videos

Molly Fitzpatrick
SOCIETY

Video Of Teacher Pepper-Sprayed At MLK Rally Stirs Outrage—And A Lawsuit

Shane Dixon Kavanaugh
HACKING

"Unhackable" Smartphone Hacked

Eric Markowitz
ISIS

ISIS Supporters Confused: Is Boko Haram Part Of Us?

Gilad Shiloach
LGBT

Hallmark Jumps On The Same-Sex Ad Bandwagon

Luke Malone
TRAVEL

MH370 Named Accident, Air Asia Facts Emerge

Abigail Tracy
US POLITICS

Hulk Tries To Smash Bibi’s Address to Congress

Oren Dotan
SOCIETY

A Breakdown Of Anita Sarkeesian's Weekly Rape And Death Threats

Luke Malone