US POLITICS

Clinton, Trump Grab Arizona; Sanders Wins Utah, Idado

And Ted Cruz took Utah with an overwhelming majority of support in the state's caucuses

US POLITICS
Hillary Clinton. — REUTERS
Mar 22, 2016 at 11:28 PM ET

Presidential hopefuls Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump secured critical victories in Arizona’s state primaries on Tuesday, while Bernie Sanders grabbed two states: Idaho and Utah.

On the Republican side, Ted Cruz took Utah with an overwhelming majority of support in the state’s caucuses.

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In Arizona, which Clinton also won in 2008, Clinton’s campaigning and connections undoubtedly helped her succeed: Both Secretary of Labor Tom Perez and former President Bill Clinton campaigned for her in the state prior to the contest, and Arizona lawmaker Rep. Ruben Gallego previously voiced his support for her—a major boon for a state whose Hispanic population counts for almost 30 percent of its residents. In addition, The Arizona Republic endorsed her.

Sanders, though, offset her win by surging ahead in Utah and Idaho, where—by 5:30 a.m. ET—he grabbed 79 and 78 percent of the vote in the states’ Democratic caucuses, respectively.

In Arizona’s Republican primary, Trump surfed to victory on his hardline immigration policies, popular among Republican voters in the border state, and will take all 58 delegates in Arizona’s winner-take-all contest. Sheriff Joe Arpaio, the controversial lawman known for his profiling of Latinos and for housing inmates in tents, endorsed Trump and is one of his most prominent backers in Arizona.

Both Trump and Clinton made strong statements about Tuesday’s terrorist attacks in Brussels, which left more than 30 dead and more than 100 injured. Trump, who claimed on Twitter to be “far more correct about terrorism than anybody,” advocated for enhanced interrogation techniques such as waterboarding to be used to thwart such attacks. Clinton, meanwhile, advocated for increased policing in the wake of the attacks in Belgium, but derided Trump’s statements on torture, saying such practices would be an “open recruitment poster for more terrorists.”