Zara Shirt Resize
#WTF

Zara Apologizes, Pulls Kids Holocaust T-Shirts

The retail behemoth quickly backpedaled after releasing a line of children's "sheriff" T-shirts that closely resemble the uniforms prisoners were forced to wear in Nazi concentration camps

Spanish retail giant Zara has been in damage-control mode this morning, following criticism that its striped “sheriff” T-shirts are eerily similar to the outfits prisoners were made to wear during the Holocaust.

A writer from +972 magazine was the first to point out the resemblance—stripes and a sheriff’s badge that looks a lot like a Star of David—and question the design, which was available in the company’s online stores.

A screen grab of the T-shirt before it was yanked down.

Zara.com

The item has since been pulled from Zara's online store.

Zara.com

The company was quick to respond, pulling the item and profusely apologizing in response to the scores of tweets condemning the shirt—which is not entirely unlike the uniform worn by the title character in John Boyne’s acclaimed novel (and its subsequent film adaptation) The Boy in the Striped Pajamas.

“We honestly apologize, it was inspired by the sheriff’s stars from the Classic Western films and is no longer in our stores,” wrote the company.

It’s not the first time Zara has come under fire for anti-Semitic designs. In 2007, the company was forced to withdraw a handbag that featured a swastika.

Respond Now
  • Does a fashion line have the right to appropriate images and symbols as it sees fit? What do we mean by images and who controls or owns any image and if one group of people choose to infer a certain meaning upon said shirts who is to say others will think otherwise? Granted it is one thing to respect the memory of war victims but also another thing to respect an individual’s or outlet’s right to express themselves as they see fit and to allow the market to be the final arbiter…or is that off the table?http://scallywagandvagabond.com/2014/08/should-zara-have-withdrawn-concentration-camp-uniform/

    2 Replies - Reply Now
    • probobaly the most sane thing i have read on the internet, well said. 

    • That’s right! These “spontaneous” campaigns of indignation are the very same thing as trolling. People feel they have the right to enforce their (just|unjust) indignation upon everyone and everything.

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